"You sit in a coffee shop and watch as passerby's walk across to the Starbucks. Your fingers rattle across your laptop keys as you code for some new encryption software. How did the world come to this? Why do people pick 4 dollar coffees from Starbuck, when the local coffee across the street is a fraction of the price? Why do we have to hide, even in the net, from the powers that be? You glance down into your backpack, which is nestled at your feet, and see a crumpled copy of Neuromancer that you've read a million times. We saw this coming, and it is happening anyway."

In this section you will find news, essays, and critical analysis of our times from a cyberpunk frame of reference.

And so here we are, the dreaded Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus week. For the purpose of this article, I am referring to Mary Shelley’s opus, and to a lesser extent Kenneth Branagh’s Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, as the two are closely linked, and my preferred interpretations of the Modern Prometheus. Frankenstein is the root of […]

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Moving on from last week, we’ll be delving deep into one of my favourite roboty texts, and analysing specific themes and motifs about the representation of the robot. I mentioned that I’d be using the Czech writer, Karel Čapek’s, use of the word; and, in essence, the term that I’ve derived from his works sums up […]

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It bewilders me that people see a strict separation between the subgenres of biopunk and cyberpunk. Cyberpunk fiction has always had a healthy dose of biological technology. For visual media, sound examples are Blade Runner (Ridley Scott) and Videodrome (David Cronenberg). For written media, good examples are Dr. Adder (K. W. Jeter), Wetware (Rudy Rucker), […]

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The term sprawl is more commonly associated with Gibson’s Sprawl series, and his imaginings of a highly technological cityscape that swathes the populous, still hyper-Orientalised; a mixing pot of a multitude of different races dwarfed by the tall, and immense buildings, drawn straight from myth and legend. The word implies a state of messiness, an […]

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Simulacra and the Multitudinous Self: Postmodern Portrayals of Cloning and Existentialism Intro: Perhaps the earliest understanding of simulacrum can be linked back to the Greek philosopher Plato. In his teachings, Plato described simulacrum as a distorted recreation that forces its viewer to think of the original differently, such as a painting that presents inaccurate details […]

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transhuman
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I used to work at a bookstore. I woke up early. Brushed my teeth. Ate something resembling breakfast. Travelled via bus for over an hour. Bought coffee. Drank coffee. Opened store. Wrote while waiting for people. Served people. Served rude people. Watched people leave. And wrote some more. And it then occurred to me, I’m […]

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   Mind as Computer: Subjective Realities and the Programmable Mind Intro: The most common portrayals of computer hacking and engineering seek to remove human elements in favor of visuals, leaving these depictions to be ridiculed by the experts they’re portraying. Sam Esmail has addressed this inauthenticity, to the surprise of many, in his post-cyberpunk drama, […]

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‘I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe…’ Roy Batty, Blade Runner 1982 Many of us understand that with George Lucas’ Star Wars, SF became Hollywood’s new thing, and was something that roused commonly accepted tropes of the stagnant genre of the time. SF could be dirty. SF could be fantastical. SF didn’t have to conform. […]

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When cyberpunk emerged in the 1980s it didn’t come into existence from a vacuum. Previously authors like Phillip K. Dick, K. W. Jeter, Vernor Vinge, and J. G. Ballard had begun to explore some of the ideas that cyberpunk would take up. These ideas included things like alienation created by technology, identity in a world […]

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